Contains mostly older stars with a red color

By Sharon R. Lee


The shape of a galaxy is determined by its gravitational force and the amount of gas, dust and new stars that it contains.

There are three main types of galaxies: spiral, elliptical and irregular. Spiral galaxies have the most active star formation; they are blue in color because their young stars emit a great deal of ultraviolet light. Elliptical galaxies consist mostly of older stars with a red color.

They have little gas or dust and only form new stars through mergers with other galaxies. About 1/3 of all galaxies are elliptical!

An elliptical galaxy most likely contains mostly older stars with a red color

You might think that an elliptical galaxy would contain mostly old stars, but this isn't always the case. The reason for their red color is that elliptical galaxies contain mostly older stars. They have very little gas, dust or new stars, making them appear red.

Elliptical galaxies are also smaller than spiral galaxies and have less mass due to their lack of gas and dust.

They are believed to be created by merging between spiral galaxies as they move closer together if a large amount of matter falls into one galactic center it will become an elliptical galaxy; if not enough matter enters then both centers will continue to rotate around each other until they merge into one larger elliptical galaxy

Elliptical galaxies also have little gas, dust, or new stars

Elliptical galaxies have little gas, dust, or new stars. Why is this?

Because they are old, elliptical galaxies do not have the same rate of star formation as other types of galaxies. This means they don't have as much gas, dust and new stars either. The lack of these elements makes them red.

They are believed to be the result of merging between spiral galaxies

The galaxy merger is believed to be the result of merging between spiral galaxies. It can also be the result of merging between elliptical galaxies, or even between a spiral galaxy and an elliptical one.

This means that these are what we call mergers between different types of galaxies: regular spirals, irregulars and ellipticals.

About 1/3 of all galaxies are elliptical

You've probably heard that the Milky Way is a spiral galaxy. But did you know that about 1/3 of all galaxies are elliptical? What makes them different from spirals?

Elliptical galaxies are believed to be the result of mergers between spiral galaxies, which explains their shape. The mergers also cause ellipticals to lack gas, dust, or new stars—they're pretty old as far as galaxies go!

Elliptical galaxies are the most common type of galaxy.

Elliptical galaxies are the most common type of galaxy. They are thought to be the result of merging between spiral galaxies, and contain mostly older stars with a red color. Ellipticals have little gas, dust, or new stars.

Conclusion

Elliptical galaxies are the most common type of galaxy, and they are believed to be the result of merging between spiral galaxies. They contain mostly older stars with a red color and very little gas, dust or new stars.

Sharon R. Lee

About the author

Hi There! I'm Lee. Welcome to A Pretty Fix, a home DIY blog about making your home colorful, decorating, and helping colors ideas and fun. Here you'll find ideas, tips, and inspiration to live life more colorfully and beautifully. Hope you stick around!

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